Information, Misinformation, Disinformation (or, “These aren’t the droids you’re looking for.”) Part 1 情報、誤報、偽情報(または『これはおまえさんたちが探しているドロイドではないぞ』――スター・ウォーズ エピソードIV/新たなる希望より)パート1

Whose job is it to make this stuff easy to understand?

“YOU CAN’T ALWAYS FIND WHAT YOU’RE LOOKING FOR…..”
[Skip to Part 2] At Safecast we assumed from the start that our data should be accurate, easy to understand, informative, well-visualized, and easily accessible. In many respects this simply reflects “best practices” in information design, as well as a vision of social responsibility in which openness and transparency are paramount virtues. So when we make decisions about how to present our data, we adhere to principles of intuitiveness, depth, context, and dare we say it, beauty in design. We want to make it as easy as possible (AEAP) for people to find what they’re looking for, and to find out what it means. That’s why we’re continually miffed when official sources of information seem to be operating under an entirely different set of assumptions.

To be honest, the seriousness of government missteps and opacity during the early weeks of the disaster led us to accommodate ourselves to vastly lowered expectations in terms of the quality and accessibility of information we’d probably see from official sources. Even though it’s their job, and they are legally required to provide many kinds of information, many of us prepared ourselves for endless tooth-pulling and fact-checking about radiation information. So first, I’d like to give a sort of brief status update:
1) The government has made a lot of information available, more than we expected (because we expected nothing).
2) It still needs to be scrutinized, fact-checked, and independently confirmed.
3) There are still some areas where a lot of us have been pulling teeth for months and still haven’t been able to get the information we’re looking for.

So let’s just agree to live with #2 and #3 for the moment. It means constant effort on our part, but enough of us are constitutionally well-equipped for this kind of research-based tug-of-war that it’s not really that onerous at this point. We get good at it, we build trust, and people who were once opponents sometimes become allies, because frankly, they need our help.

But #1 is where we find ourselves really scratching our heads. There is all sorts of official information available, and a lot of it is proving reliable, but it’s rarely as easily accessible or informative as it should be. In fact, locating and using the data is usually as difficult as possible (ADAP) considering how easy it is now to find good information and web designers, and how inexpensive it has become. It should be easy to do a good job, if the people in charge really care about doing a good job.

Whose job is it to make this stuff easy to understand?

「探しものが必ずしも見つかるとは限りません… 」

[パート2へ移動]

セーフキャストでは、当初から、収集するデータは正確で分かりやすく、有益かつ上手に可視化され、誰もが簡単にデータ・アクセスできるべきだと考えてきました。これは多くの点で、情報デザイン、並びに社会的責任を果たすというビジョンにおいて、模範事例(ベストプラクティス)となっているかと思います。

その際、セーフキャストのデータのオープン化と透明性が最重要とされてきています。我々のデータの表示方法は、直観的かつ、思慮深さがあること、コンテクスト(背景情報)も提供することを原則としており、さらに、デザイン的な美しさも追求しています。

求めている情報が誰にでも簡単に見つけられるように、内容もできるだけ分かりやすく伝えられるよう心がけてきました。このような価値観と相反する形で、諸公機関から公式情報が発表されるたびに、私たちは戸惑いを覚えます。

率直な感想として、原発事故が起きてからの最初の数週間、政府は失策を続け、全くと言っていいほど情報が欠如した状態が続いたので、一般市民は政府が発表する情報の質やアクセスしやすさといった点では、かなり妥協せざるを得ませんでした。政府による情報提供は当然の義務であり、法的にも義務付けられているはずなのですが、結論から言うと、私たちセーフキャストの多くは一生懸命に放射能情報を収集し、事実確認を重ねてきました。まずここでは簡単な近況報告をします。

(1)政府は予想以上に多くの情報を持っている(以前は私たちが全く期待していなかったのですが…)

(2)しかし、依然として情報の内容確認、事実確認が必要で、政府サイドではない第三者による調査が必要である

(3)何カ月もかけて調査しても、依然として情報収集のためにすら近づけない地域がある

さしあたって(2)と(3)については仕方がないとしましょう。つまり、セーフキャストは今後も引き続き調査していかなければならないということになるのですが、こういった調査は得意としていますし、モチベーションの高いメンバーが揃っているので、今のところさほど大変なことではありません。調査も精度を増し、信頼も築きあげ、かつては敵対した立場にあった人たちとも同志となりました。

しかし、そうは言っても、(1)に関しては、セーフキャストとしても、今後どのように対応していけばいいのか非常に悩むところです。様々な公式情報が入手可能となりました。また、その多くは信頼できる内容です。

しかし、分かりやすく有益な情報に簡単にアクセスできるようになったとまでは言えないのが現状です。今のご時勢、腕の良いウェブ・デザイナーや有益な情報を見つけるのは容易なはずですが、文部科学省(以下、文科省)のウェブサイトは利用者にとって、「できるだけ難しく、使いにくい」(as difficult as possible – 略して “ADAP”)作りになっています。ですので、そこから情報を見つけたり、データを使用することが非常に難しくなっています。ウェブサイトの担当者が良い仕事をしようと心掛けてくれれば、もっと上手な形で情報公開できるはずなのですが…。

The Canberra Fastscan series of whole body counters is being used by many hospitals in Fukushima to measure the internal contamination of residents.

REPORTING THE RESULTS OF WHOLE-BODY TESTS:
One brief example would be how results of internal contamination monitoring done with whole-body counters (WBC) are being reported. These tests are being done in municipalities all over Fukushima prefecture, sometimes under the direction of the prefecture itself, more often by individual hospitals on behalf of their municipalities. Fukushima Prefecture has put up a web page to communicate the results of testing done through Oct. 2012, as well as a more detailed breakdown. They’ve gathered quite a lot of numbers for us:

The WBC report page provided by Fukushima Prefecture summarizes the key data in this table. It shows how something can be entirely accurate and extremely uninformative at the same time.[

Fukushima Prefecture WBC results page (Japanese)
Fukushima Prefecture WBC results breakdown (pdf; Japanese)

They report that of 90,050 people tested from June through October 2012, 90,024 of them are determined to be exposed to an effective dose of 1 millisievert or less from internal contamination. The breakdown tells us how many people of each age category were tested in each municipality. Well, thank you very much Fukushima Prefecture. But it would have been very easy to give much more informative data. In fact, we wonder why they haven’t you been following the lead of Minamisoma, Hirata, and other towns in the prefecture which give us data that looks like this:

The towns of Hirata, Minamisoma, and several others have taken the initiative to provide WBC results in a much more detailed way, which also happens to be visually readable. This graph from Hirata summarizes and presents more useful data than Fukushima Prefecture’s table above.

Minamisoma City WBC results (Japanese)

They provide a full breakdown by contamination levels in Bq/kg, by age group, by gender, and showing change over time. There’s information about food and water sources, how much time people spend outdoors, all with clear and consistent graphs. The official Fukushima Prefecture report doesn’t even tell us how many of the “less than 1 millisievert” people actually had no contamination detected at all (ND). What we need to know is what the actual internal contamination levels were in Bq/body and Bq/kg, because while even a person with a high count in Bq/body still might not reach a 1mSv dose, we obviously want to reduce these levels quickly. We need detailed information in order to understand the effectiveness of food protection and decontamination measures, to be able to monitor government policy in these areas well, and to be informed enough to take action if necessary. The Fukushima Pref. reporting has all the hallmarks of a manager somewhere having decided that the most important thing is just to provide evidence that the tests were done, and that they hit their targets. The actual information content was absolutely secondary. Dr. Masaharu Tsubokura and Dr. Ryu Hayano advise Minamisoma City General Hospital and Hirata Central Hospital, as well as other municipalities, on their WBC programs. They spent months working with hospital staff testing various kinds of equipment and working out calibration issues to find the most reliable procedures and methods, and they gave great thought to how to report the results informatively, pushing for openness and candor. Dr. Tsubokura writes very informative and readable regular blogs, and sends email newsletters to help people interpret the results and put them in context: Dr. Tsubokura’s blog (Japanese)

This is very important, because the results require some interpretation. For instance, people need to know that a WBC test is like a snapshot, which captures the current state, but really can’t say much about how contaminated a person was several months previously. The tests also cannot tell us much about external exposures. Dr. Tsubokura has done an excellent job of explaining the limitations of the tests, the importance of using well monitored food sources, and why it’s best to measure entire families together, among other things. Fukushima hasn’t taken any of this into consideration in its WBC reporting. The kind of full reporting Minamisoma has promoted is gradually being adopted by other municipalities, but not by the prefecture, and certainly not by the central government. The latter don’t feel any obligation to make it easy. I think they expect us to be grateful that there’s any information available online at all. Some see conspiracy to deceive at work here, some see knee-jerk obfuscation, but it’s just as likely that no-one responsible for putting this information out was specifically tasked with making graphs, including a Bq/kg breakdown, etc.. If they weren’t specifically told to do it, they didn’t. We see evidence of this kind of thinking with distressing frequency.

This murasoi fish, a type of rockfish, was caught near the breakwater alongside the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP in January, 2013. It measured an eye-popping 254,000 Bq/kg. (Tepco photo)

REPORTING THE RESULTS OF SEAFOOD TESTS:
Another brief example involves contamination testing results for fish and seafood. Since last year, both the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare (MHLW) and the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF), through its Japan Fisheries Agency (JFA) branch, have been testing fish for radioactive contamination and publicizing the results. Fish as well as other food items are tested before being put on the market, and types that test above the gov’t limit of 100Bq/kg are not allowed to go on sale. From the beginning many people have been skeptical that food was being tested reliably enough to really keep unsafe items out of stores, and have criticized the government for not communicating the results clearly. The testing results from MAFF, in this case covering from Oct. 1 to Dec. 6, 2012, look like this:

Both the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare (MHLW) and the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) have been providing detailed statistics on test results for food contamination. This is the first page of a 34-page spreadsheet from MAFF. Trying to glean trends and changes over time from this spreadsheet is a test of diligence.

Recent Japan Fisheries Agency test results (pdf; Japanese)

There’s a lot of data here, dozens of pages worth. Hundreds of individual test entires, with results, testing parameters, dates, the location the fish were caught, etc.. The data can be downloaded in both pdf and excel formats, and all the older data is available. A few months ago, a number of us were looking though this data to try to determine if contamination levels in fish were decreasing or not, because that’s what most people really wanted to know. It was extremely laborious to count items that were above the approval limit, to note the highest levels found for each month, etc.. And then in October of this year, a US-based researcher named Ken Buesseler at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute released a study that used the same MAFF database, and sliced and diced it to show what kinds of fish were decreasing in contamination and where, and what kinds were not:

Buesseler’s graphs, which are based on essentially the same MAFF data, tell the entire story in a glance.

Buesseler Fukushima fish study summary

Buesseler Fukushima fish study abstract and link to whole paper (paywall)

Thank you, Dr. Buesseler! This information was already in the MAFF data, but someone with a bit of expert knowledge about fish types and habitats had to take the time to put it in context, visualize it for the rest of us, and publicize it. By grouping the results according to categories which reflect their ecological niches, and graphing the results simply, we can see that bottom-feeders (in particular those caught off Fukushima), as well as fresh water fish, remain very contaminated; pelagic species (which live near the surface) are in general much less contaminated; and epipelagic (habitat from surface to 200 meters below) and neuston (mainly coastal, surface dwelling species) have basically been under the government’s 100Bq/kg limit since around Sept. 2011. It’s particularly important to know about the bottom-feeders, because the fact that their contamination levels have not been decreasing much indicates how contaminated the seafloor off Fukushima Prefecture is (further research that Buessler and his colleagues participated in shows that the main mechanism keeping the seafloor and bottom feeders contaminated is plankton poop which drifts down and is eaten by the fish. See: Woods Hole symposium presentations). Why didn’t MAFF lay it out this clearly? Why, as in the case of the WBC data, did it have to wait until someone outside the government, who didn’t have responsibility for it, stepped up, spent the time, and gave it the required thought?

If you’re beginning to see a pattern here of the government either being less than totally helpful or actually making things ADAP, there’s more….

to Part 2

キャンベラ・ファストスキャン・シリーズのホールボディ・カウンターは。福島県内の多くの病院で住民の内部被爆の検査に使用されています。

ホールボディ・カウンターによる内部被ばく検査の結果報告について

ホールボディ・カウンター(WBC)による内部被ばくのモニタリング結果の報告を一例として取り上げてみます。この検査は福島県内の各自治体で実施されていますが、福島県が直接行うこともあります。

また、各自治体の代わりに個人病院が検査を実施することもよくあります。福島県は2012年10月一杯までの検査結果と項目ごとに分類された詳細情報をウェブページ上で開示しています。ここにはかなり大きい数字が並べられています。(下の表参照)。

福島県が提供しているホールボディ・カウンターによる内部被ばく検査結果報告書には、上記表にある主要データがまとめられています。表記された情報そのものは正確ですが、その一方で、非常に分かりにくい形で情報が並べられています。[

福島県のWBC内部被ばく検査の結果ページ(日本語)

福島県のWBC内部被ばく検査の結果の内訳(PDF、日本語)

2012年6月から10月までの期間に、被験者90,050人中、90,024人が実効線量1ミリシーベルト未満の内部被ばくレベルにあったと報告されています。結果の内訳詳細を見てみると、各自治体で検査を実施した際の被験者数が年代別に表示されています。この場を借りて、この情報を公開して下さった福島県に謝意を申し上げます。その一方で、もう少し分かりやすく、かつ有益なデータを簡単に提供することもできたのでは、と感じます。

実のところ、福島県は、どうして南相馬市や平田市といった市町村が既に実施している検査結果報告の方式を取り入れないのだろう、とすら思っています。(下図参照)。

平田市、南相馬市をはじめとする市町村では、率先してホールボディ・カウンターによる内部被ばく検査結果が詳細に報告されています。検査結果も視覚化して表示しているので見やすくなっています。先ほど紹介した福島県の表よりも、この平田市のグラフの方がより有益なデータが分かりやすくまとめられて表示しています。

南相馬市のWBC内部被ばく検査結果

平田市のデータでは、1キロ当たりのベクレル数、年代別グループ、性別、そして経時的変化といった項目ごとに詳細情報を提示しています。また、食品、水道水、屋外滞在時間数といった情報も発表しています。どれもわかりやすく、一貫性を保ってグラフ表示しています。福島県の公式報告では、「1ミリシーベルト未満」の内部被ばくレベルと判定された被験者のうち、一体、何人が内部被ばくせずに済んだのかということも分かりません。

我々が知りたいのは、実際の内部被ばくレベルは一人当たり何ベクレル(Bq/body)だったのか、1キロ当たり何ベクレル(Bq/kg)だったのかということです。というのも、ある人の被ばく量が年間1mSV未満だったとしても、一人あたりのベクレルが高いということも有り得るからです。その場合、その内部被ばくレベルをすぐにでも下げる必要があります。

詳細情報があれば食品保護と除染対策の有効性が見えてきますし、関連分野における政策を監視することも可能です。また、十分な情報があれば、必要に応じて一般市民も行動に移すことができます。福島県の報告書ですが、まるで監査役の人が、報告に一番重要なのは検査が実施されたことを示す証拠を提示することで、その目標を達成すればそれでいい、と決めてしまっているかのような報告の仕方になっています。実際に、報告書の内容は、一番大切と思われる情報を含んでいません。

坪倉正治医師(東京大学医科学研究所)や早野龍五教授(東京大学大学院理学系研究科)は、南相馬市立総合病院やひらた中央病院をはじめ、他の地方自治体に対し、ホールボディ・カウンターによる内部被ばく検査プログラム実施に関して助言されています。先生方は何カ月も掛けて病院の職員たちと共に取り組み、いろいろな機材を確認しながらテストし、機材のメモリ調整も行っています。検査実施法や調査方法論的に万全を期す形で臨んでいます。また、結果報告の仕方に関しても、どのような形で報告すれば人々のためになるのかという点についても熟慮されており、情報の透明性と公平性が追求されています。坪倉先生は非常に分かりやすい形で為になる情報を定期的にブログで発信しています。メールによるニューズレターを配信することで、一般の人にも検査結果内容が理解できるよう、様々な情報を織り交ぜて解説しています。

坪倉先生のブログ

検査結果を理解するには、ある程度の説明が必要になってくるので、そのような形で解説するというのは非常に大切なことなのです。例えば、ホールボディ・カウンターによる内部被ばく検査というのは、あくまでも、ある時点における状況を捉えただけのスナップショットのようなもので、現状は掴めるものの、それ以上の内容、たとえば、それよりも数カ月前の時点でその人がどれだけ内部被ばくを受けていたかと言ったことまでは知ることができません。

また、この検査では外部被ばくに関しての情報は全く分かりません。坪倉先生は、ホールボディ・カウンターによる内部被ばく検査には限界があること、そして、食品の放射線量をしっかり監視する必要があること、それから、個人単位ではなく一世帯単位で測定するのが最適な理由などをわかりやすく解説しています。

残念ながら、福島県の報告書には、そういった配慮は全く見られません。南相馬市が推進してきた詳細報告のやり方は、他の自治体でも受け入れられるようになってきましたが、福島県や日本政府ではまだ取り入れられていません。県や国は検査結果を市民・国民に分かりやすく伝える義務などないと思っているのでしょうか。情報がオンラインで公開されれば、国民はそれで喜ぶと思っているのでしょうか。人によっては、政府はごまかそうとしているのではないか、または、組織的な慣習から無意識のうちに事実を隠蔽してしまっているのではと勘繰る人もいるかもしれません。でも、実際には、検査結果公表に関しての担当者が、1キロ当たりのベクレル線量を項目ごとに詳細表示しながらグラフを作成するよう指示されていなかっただけなのかもしれません。指示がなければ、そうしないのでしょう。残念ながら、福島の事故以来、こういったことはよく見受けられます。

メバル科のこのムラソイという魚は、2013年1月、東京電力福島第一原発港湾内で獲られたものです。この魚から25万4000ベクレル/kgと目が飛び出しそうなほど驚くべき数値が計測されています。(写真:東電提供)

海産食品検査結果報告に関して

他の例として魚介類の放射能汚染検査結果を見てみましょう。昨年(2011年)から厚生労働省と農林水産省は水産庁を通じて魚の放射性物質汚染検査を行い、結果を一般公開しています。魚を含む様々な食品は市場に出回る前に検査が行われます。政府が設定した新基準値100Bq/kgを上回った品目は市場に流通しないよう出荷制限がかけられます。基準値を超える食品が店頭に並ぶことのないよう、十分に食品検査は実施されているのか、と懸念する声は当初からかなり聞かれていました。

食品検査結果について、政府がまだ明確な説明をしていない、との批判の声も上がっています。2012年10月1日~12月6日の期間に実施された農林水産省発表の検査結果報告表をご覧ください。

厚生労働省と農林水産省は食品における放射性物質調査の検査結果に関して、詳細な統計データを公開しています。この表は農林水産省発表の34ページ分のスプレッド・シートから構成される報告書(PDF版)の1ページ目からの抜粋です。このスプレッド・シートから、ある傾向を読み取ったり、時間推移の中でデータがどのように変化しているかを把握するには、かなり根気と労力が要ります。

最近の日本の水産庁の試験結果(PDF、日本語)

ここには数十ページ分に相当する大量のデータが載せられています。何百回にも及ぶ個々の検査品目が、検査結果、検査パラメーター、検査実施日、魚を捕獲した場所などの情報とともに入力されています。データはPDF、エクセルのどちらのフォーマットでもダウンロードできますし、過去にさかのぼったデータも入手可能です。数ヵ月前になりますが、魚の安全性に関しては一般の人々も強い関心を持つ方が多いのではと思い、セーフキャストのメンバーでこのデータを読み込み、魚の放射線汚染レベルが下がってきているのかどうかを調べてみました。

基準値を超える品目を数えたり、月ごとに検出された検出された最高測定値の記録を書き起こすのは非常に骨の折れる作業でした。そして2012年10月には、米国在住のウッズホール海洋学研究所研究員、ケン・ベッセラー(Ken Buesseler)氏が、同じ農林水産省のデータベースを使ってデータを細分化して分析し、放射能汚染レベルが低下してきている魚の種類はどれか、また、低下していない魚の種類とその生息場所を明らかにした研究結果を発表しました。

このベッセラーのグラフ、本質的には農林水産省のデータをもとに作成しただけなのですが、このグラフを見れば、ひと目で全体像がすぐに掴めるようになっています。

ベッセラーの福島沿岸・太平洋沖魚介類放射能汚染濃度調査 概要

ベッセラーの福島沿岸・太平洋沖魚介類放射能汚染濃度調査 要約(無料)と全論文(有料)へのリンク

ベッセラー博士に感謝します。

この情報は農林水産省のデータ中に既に埋もれていたということになるのですが、魚の種類や生息地についてちょっとした専門知識のある人が、時間をかけ、いろんな情報を織り交ぜながら、一般の人でも理解できるよう結果を視覚化し、公表してくれたのですから。

結果を項目ごとに分け、生態学的地位(ニッチ)を反映させながら結果を分かりやすく視覚化することで、海底で餌を取る魚(特に福島沿岸で獲れた魚)や淡水魚は、依然として放射能汚染度が高いままなのが見えてきます。また、遠海魚(深海魚ではなく海水の表面付近に生息する魚)は一般的にそれほど汚染されていません。表海水層に生息する魚(水深200メーター以上の生息地とするもの)や水表生物(主に沿岸の水面近くに生息するもの)は、2011年9月以後政府が定めた基準値100 Bq/kg未満におさまっています。

特に注意しなければならないのは海底に生息する魚です。海底魚の汚染レベルがあまり下がっていないということからも分かるように、福島県沿岸の海底はかなり汚染されてしまっています。(海底とそこに生息する魚が汚染されてしまうのは、プランクトンの排せつ物が海底に沈殿し、海底魚がそれを餌として食べてしまうためだということが、ベッセラー率いる研究チームの他の調査で明らかにされています。(詳細はウッズホール・シンポジウムでの発表をご参照ください

どうして農林水産省はベッセラーのように分かりやすく結果を報告してくれないのでしょうか。ホールボディ・カウンターによる内部被ばく検査の場合と同じで、政府とは関係のない人が敢えて時間をかけてデータ分析をし、一般の人にも分かりやすく伝わるよう結果報告してくれるのを待たなければならないのでしょうか。

みなさんもそろそろ政府が繰り返しているパターンにお気づきかもしれません。政府はほんの少しだけ役立つ情報を提供している、もしくは、できるだけ分かりにくい形で(ADAP)データを公表しているのです。

この話はパート2へ続きます…。

About the Author

Azby Brown

Azby Brown is Safecast's lead researcher and primary author of the Safecast Report. A widely published authority in the fields of design, architecture, and the environment, he has lived in Japan for over 30 years, and founded the KIT Future Design Institute in 2003. He joined Safecast in mid-2011, and frequently represents the group at international expert conferences.